Chateau Resources

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7)
Assessment

The GAD 7 is a mental health evaluation model aimed at anxiety severity. It takes the form of a questionnaire that is administered to patients in the clinical environment.

GAD 7 Scoring Interpretation

The GAD-7 score is calculated by assigning scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3, to the response categories of 'not at all', 'several days', 'more than half the days', and 'nearly every day', respectively, and adding together the scores for the seven questions.

Scores of 5, 10, and 15 are taken as the cut-off points for mild, moderate and severe anxiety, respectively. When used as a screening tool, further evaluation is recommended when the score is 10 or greater.

Using the threshold score of 10, the GAD-7 has a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 82% for GAD. It is moderately good at screening three other common anxiety disorders - panic disorder (sensitivity 74%, specificity 81%), social anxiety disorder (sensitivity 72%, specificity 80%) and post-traumatic stress disorder (sensitivity 66%, specificity 81%)

The table introduces the scores along their interpretation and a recommendation:

Gad7 Scoring Table.png

Spitzer RL, Kroenke K, Williams JB, Löwe B. A brief measure for assessing generalized anxiety disorder: the GAD-7. Arch Intern Med. 2006 May 22;166(10):1092-7.

Disclaimer: This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Chateau Recovery has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but makes no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

Neither Chateau Recovery or MDApp collect or save any data entered in this assessment.

 

Depression (PHQ-9) Assessment

The PHQ 9 belongs to a series of mental health questionnaires which evaluate patient symptoms in search for a mental disorder, in this case, depression.

The tool consists of 9 items that relate to different depressive symptoms.

The patient is asked whether they consider they experience those symptoms, and if so, to rate the frequency.

PHQ-9 Scoring Interpretation

This easy to use patient questionnaire is a self-administered version of the PRIME-MD diagnostic instrument for common mental disorders. The PHQ-9 is the depression module, which scores each of the nine DSM-IV criteria as "0" (not at all) to "3" (nearly every day). It has been validated for use in primary care.

It is not a screening tool for depression but it is used to monitor the severity of depression and response to treatment. However, it can be used to make a tentative diagnosis of depression in at-risk populations - eg, those with coronary heart disease or after stroke.

When screening for depression the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) can be used first (it has a 97% sensitivity and a 67% specificity). If this is positive, the PHQ-9 can then be used, which has 61% sensitivity and 94% specificity in adults.

The table introduces the scores along their interpretation and a recommendation:

PHQ9 Scoring Table.png

Kroenke K, Spitzer RL, Williams JB. The PHQ-9: validity of a brief depression severity measure. J Gen Intern Med. 2001; 16(9):606-13.

Disclaimer: This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Chateau Recovery has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but makes no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

Neither Chateau Recovery or MDApp collect or save any data entered in this assessment.

 

ACES Childhood Trauma Assessment

An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your score is likely to be and the higher your risk for later health problems. You can take the test below:

So, you've got your score. Now what?

First, remember that the ACE score isn't a crystal ball; it's just meant as guidance. It tells you about one type of risk factor among many. It doesn't directly take into account your diet or genes, or whether you smoke or drink excessively — to name just a few of the other major influences on health.

To learn more, check the CDC's ACE Study website. You'll find, among other things, a list of studies that explore the ways adverse childhood experiences have been linked to a variety of adult conditions, ranging from increased headaches to depression to heart disease.

Remember this, too: ACE scores don't tally the positive experiences in early life that can help build resilience and protect a child from the effects of trauma. Having a grandparent who loves you, a teacher who understands and believes in you, or a trusted friend you can confide in may mitigate the long-term effects of early trauma, psychologists say.

Disclaimer: This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Chateau Recovery has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but makes no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

Neither Chateau Recovery or NPR collect or save any data entered in this assessment.